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Core Commitments

for Children

are the core UNICEF policy and framework for humanitarian action

Frequently Asked Questions

Revision Process

Revision Process


  • Since the Core Commitments for Children in Humanitarian Action (CCCs) were introduced in 1998 and revised in 2010, the global humanitarian context has changed significantly. The CCCs have been revised to equip UNICEF and its partners to deliver principled, timely, quality and child-centred humanitarian response and advocacy in any crises with humanitarian consequences.
  • UNICEF has been revising the Core Commitments for Children in Humanitarian Action, through an inclusive and consultative process including Country Offices (COs), Regional Offices (ROs) and HQ (Headquarters), as well as partners (UN, INGOs), and external stakeholders and humanitarian experts.
    • The Field Task Force, composed of the Regional Emergency Advisors and CO-based colleagues, facilitated the consultations with all the Regional Offices and a sample of 30 Country Offices.
    • The Senior Advisory Group, composed of senior staff with strong experience in emergency response and operations, based at Headquarters, Regional Office, and Country Office.
    • The External Advisory Group, composed of SPHERE, ALNAP, INTERACTION, ICVA, OCHA, WFP, and ICRC. UNHCR, WHO, IOM were added through bilateral consultations.
    • Consultations of Civil Society Organizations through ICVA and INTERACTION (members of the EAG and committed to reflect their members (our Implementing Partners) positions), a Presentation to ICVA members held on 22 August, a presentation to 70 Representatives of UNICEF partners during UNICEF-NGO consultation organized in Geneva on 11-12 November.
  • Member States were kept informed on the process and content of the new CCCs, via formal communication by PPD focal points, annual consultations, oral update on humanitarian action at the second regular session of 11-13 September 2019. During the development of the CCCs from 2007 to 2010, there was no formal consultations organized with Member States. They were kept informed on the process.
  • The CCCs have been approved by EMOPS, PD,DAPM director before being endorsed by the DED programmes and the ED.





Scope of the CCCs

What are the CCCs?


  • Initially developed in 1998 and reviewed in 2004, and in 2010, the Core Commitments for Children in Humanitarian Action (CCCs) are the core UNICEF policy and framework for humanitarian action.
  • Grounded in global humanitarian norms and standards, the CCCs set commitments and benchmarks against which UNICEF holds itself accountable for the coverage, quality and equity of its humanitarian action and advocacy.
  • Form the core UNICEF policy and framework for humanitarian action and are mandatory for all UNICEF personnel. They define the guiding principles as well as the organizational, programmatic and operational commitments and benchmarks against which UNICEF can be held accountable for the coverage, quality and equity of its humanitarian action.
  • Guide every stakeholder, including governments and civil society organizations (CSOs), in designing their humanitarian action and in setting and meeting standards for respecting, protecting and fulfilling the rights of children.

[1] The UN system-wide agenda for Sustaining Peace focuses on the contribution the UN system can make to end some of the world’s most devastating and protracted armed conflicts and support UN Member States in their efforts to prevent armed conflict and sustain peace. See General Assembly resolution A/RES/70/262 and Security Council resolution S/RES/2282 (2016).




What norms and standards guide the CCCs?


The CCCs are guided by international human rights law, in particular the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), and in complex emergencies, International Humanitarian Law. Norms and standards include:

• Humanitarian Principles;

• General Assembly Resolutions, in particular Resolution 26/182 which creates the IASC;

• Relevant Security Council resolutions, including those pertaining to the protection of children affected by armed conflict;

• Core Humanitarian Standards, Sphere, Minimum Standards for Education in Emergencies INEE MSEE, Child Protection Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Action (CPMS)




What is the status of the CCCs? (vis a vis other internal policies and strategic documents?


  • CCC are a Policy.

    • Every Policy is issued by the Executive Director consistent with decisions from the UNICEF Executive Board, Security Council, the General Assembly and its relevant Committees (for UN system-wide application).

    • A Policy establishes the overall framework within which UNICEF operates (both programmatically and with regard to administrative or operational matters). All programme, management, and operations policies are issued by the Executive Director. Compliance is mandatory.

  • The CCCs are the UNICEF corporate framework for humanitarian action. They target both internal and external audience and are to be used as:

  • A mandatory policy for all UNICEF personnel, with organizational and managerial commitments

  • A communication and advocacy instrument

  • A programming reference for UNICEF and its partners to design programmes and partnership agreements

  • A reference framework for planning, monitoring and reporting for every UNICEF Country Office. CCC benchmarks are supported by existing accountability and reporting systems , including the CCC Indicator Guidance and CCCs Monitoring Framework for Operational Commitments

  • A partnership tool for UNICEF and its partners to discuss mutual accountabilities

  • A one-stop shop on the most up-to-date humanitarian policies and guidance on programmes and operations –through hyperlinks that will be regularly updated during the shelf life of the CCCs.

  • The new CCC are integrated/ mainstreamed into UNICEF Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation (PME) and reporting instruments. This systematic reference to the CCCs in all planning and reporting documents supports UNICEF systematic implementation and strengthens UNICEF accountability to deliver on the CCCs.

    • The new CCCs are released with a CCC Indicator Guidance, companion to the CCCs, providing a compendium of indicators that outlines the alignment between the CCCs (Commitments and Benchmarks), the Strategic Plan, and the overall Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation system, as well as the reporting architecture, including the Results Assessment Module (RAM), the Strategic Monitoring Questions (SMQs), the Humanitarian Action for Children (HAC) and the Situation Reports reporting systems.

    • The CCCs and the Indicator Guidance will be used as a programming reference and planning tool by the Country Offices in their planning (CPD, HAC) and reporting cycles (Situation Reports, Annual Reports). This will allow a streamlined and systematic reporting against the CCCs in UNICEF Annual reports.

    • The CCCs are also reflected in the key UNICEF planning documents, including in the Strategic Plan. They also guide UNICEF contributions to Inter-Agency Humanitarian planning cycle.




What remains the same? (in comparison with the 2010 version)


  • The CCCs continue to be the central policy and core framework for UNICEF humanitarian action, describing UNICEF’s core accountability and obligations in humanitarian action. They state the organization’s – and each Country Office’s commitment to respond.
  • They cover 1) Policies, principles and accountability, 2) Programme commitments, 3) Operational commitments.
  • Programmes are structured around a Strategic Result, results-based Commitments with associated Benchmarks, derived from global standards in the respective programme areas.
  • UNICEF’s role both as cluster leader and cluster partner is reflected in the sector commitments.




What is new?


  • The new CCC reflect the main change in global humanitarian context and the diversity of the humanitarian crises (protracted, complex, multi-layered crises, urbanization, climate change, migration), the impact on children, and the demand for UNICEF to adapt its framework and response.
  • The new way to position the CCCs internally and externally, as:
  • A mandatory policy for all UNICEF personnel, the CCCs form the core UNICEF policy and framework for humanitarian action and are mandatory for all UNICEF personnel.
  • A communication and advocacy instrument for engaging with Governments and other relevant stakeholders. The new website of UNICEF in emergencies is also built around the new CCCs. corecommitments.unicef.org
  • A reference framework for planning, monitoring and reporting for every UNICEF Country Office. CCC benchmarks are supported by existing accountability and reporting systems, including the CCC Indicator Guidance.
  • A programming reference for UNICEF and its partners to design programmes and partnership agreements and a one-stop shop on the most up-to-date humanitarian policies and guidance on programmes and operations – through hyperlinks that will be regularly updated during the shelf life of the CCCs.
  • A partnership tool for UNICEF and its partners to discuss mutual accountabilities.
  • The performance monitoring of the CCCs is made possible through systematic reference in the planning, monitoring and reporting system
  • The systematic reference to the CCCs in UNICEF planning and reporting documents (HAC, Sitrep, CPD, Annual Workplans, PCA and Programme Documents signed with partners) will support their implementation and strengthen UNICEF accountability to deliver on the CCCs.
  • The CCC Indicator Guidance, developed jointly by EMOPS/PD/DAPM, to help Country Offices (COs) plan, monitor and report against their humanitarian programming. The CCC indicator guidance aligns the indicators of the Results Assessment Module (RAM), the Strategic Monitoring Questions (SMQs), the Humanitarian Action for Children (HAC) and the Situation Reports in the same framework. This will assist COs to coherently plan, monitor and report their humanitarian response. It will be launched and featured in the HAC Guidance for 2021.
  • The CCCs and the Indicator Guidance will thus be used as a programming reference and planning tool by the Country Offices in their planning (CPD, HAC) and reporting cycles (Situation Reports, Annual Reports). This will allow a streamlined and systematic reporting against the CCCs in UNICEF Annual reports.

  • The CCCs contain updated policies in line with international norms and standards and reflecting new positions and agreements within the humanitarian community
  • Global Humanitarian Standards (incl SPHERE, CPMS, INEE), Centrality of Protection, Accountability to Affected Populations (AAP), Child Safeguarding, Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA), Ethical Evidence Generation and Data Protection.
  • Guiding Principles: human rights-based approach, do no harm, best interest of the child.
  • Guidance on the application of Humanitarian Principles in UNICEF operations
  • Stronger focus on UNICEF role in Humanitarian Advocacy : UNICEF role and commitment on public and private advocacy to protect the rights of children and women and affected populations - as an integral part of humanitarian action - comes stronger in the document, with a greater focus on humanitarian advocacy in complex and high threat environment
  • Commitments and Benchmarks on principled Humanitarian Access in order to strengthen leadership to leave no-one behind even is hardest to reach areas
  • Guidance on UNICEF engagement in UN integrated settings
  • Guidance on UNICEF Engagement with Non-State Entities
  • Organizational and Managerial Commitments are established for all UNICEF personnel and Senior Managers at CO/RO/HQ to deliver on our corporate commitment to humanitarian results
  • A new section on UNICEF institutional responsibilities to deliver on the CCCs is further developed, outlining the role and responsibilities of all divisions, and all staff to deliver on emergency response, and mentioning the internal procedures set up to allow UNICEF to be a timely, predictable and efficient partner. Through the CCCs, UNICEF’s roles and responsibilities will be known and visible with consistency to partners.
  • Managerial commitments for senior managers at FO/CO/RO/HQ level are anchored in UNICEF Competency Framework, and introduce the concept of humanitarian leadership.
  • A new scope of application is adopted
  • The CCCs should be used by every Country Office (CO) as a framework to monitor the situation of women and children and take appropriate preparedness and response measures, in order to deliver predictable, timely, principled and child-centred humanitarian response.
  • The CCCs apply in every crisis and describe UNICEF commitments to the most disadvantaged children and their families, regardless of the kind of crisis (sudden-onset or protracted emergencies, natural disasters, public health emergencies, complex emergencies such as international or internal armed conflicts, etc), irrespective of the Gross National Income level of the country (low, middle or high) or legal status of the affected populations.
  • New programme commitments, including overarching, multi-sectoral commitments all supported by measurable benchmarks, applicable in all COs
  • Overarching Commitments supported with measurable benchmarks applicable to all COs: Preparedness; Coordination; Supply; Humanitarian Access; PSEA; AAP
  • Overarching Approaches supported with measurable benchmarks applicable to all COs: Quality of programmes; Multisectoral and integrated programming; Equity, linking humanitarian and development; Environmental sustainability and climate change; Localization; Community engagement for behaviour and social change; Humanitarian cash transfers. (Note the link with our Grand Bargain commitments).
  • All Programme commitments are supported by the CCCs Indicator Guidance, developed jointly by EMOPS/PD/DAPM
  • 3 commitments are mainstreamed in all sectors: coordination/leadership, system strengthening/linking humanitarian and development programming; community engagement
  • Cross-sectoral Commitments: Gender; Disabilities; Adolescents; Early Childhood Development
  • Situation specific commitments on Public health emergencies; Large displacements of refugees, migrants and internally displaced people. (developed with WHO, UNHCR, IOM)
  • For all sectors Key Considerations are developed on: Advocacy; Coordination and Partnerships; Quality Programming and Standards; Linking Humanitarian and Development.
  • Operational commitments are strengthened, and all supported by measurable benchmarks monitored in VISION, enabling greater accountability on the timeliness and efficiency of our humanitarian response,
  • They Include not only Commitments, but also Benchmarks and Key considerations.
  • All benchmarks refer to the Emergency Procedures and have been crafted to be monitorable
  • Are all Monitored in VISION to track performance in HR, Finance and Administration, Supply and Logistics, Partnerships, Resource Mobilization…

  • An additional section dedicated to UNICEF commitments on Partnerships with governments and civil society organizations for programme implementation describes UNICEF commitment to be a predictable and reliable partner.





Application

WHEN: When do the CCCs apply? When are they used?


  • The CCCs must be used by every Country Office (CO) as a framework to monitor the situation of women and children and take appropriate preparedness and response measures, in order to deliver predictable, timely, principled and child-centred humanitarian response.
  • Humanitarian action for UNICEF encompasses interventions aimed at saving lives, alleviating suffering, maintaining human dignity and protecting rights of affected populations, wherever there are humanitarian needs, regardless of the kind of crisis (sudden-onset or protracted emergencies, natural disasters, public health emergencies, complex emergencies, international or internal armed conflicts, etc.[1]), irrespective of the Gross National Income level of a country (low, middle or high), or legal status of the affected populations. Humanitarian action also encompasses interventions addressing underlying risks and causes of vulnerability to disasters, fragility and conflict, such as system strengthening and resilience-building, which contribute to reducing humanitarian needs, risks and vulnerabilities of affected populations.
  • The CCCs describe UNICEF commitments to the most disadvantaged children and their families, regardless of the kind of crisis (sudden-onset or protracted emergencies, natural disasters, public health emergencies, complex emergencies such as international or internal armed conflicts, etc), irrespective of the Gross National Income level of the country (low, middle or high) or legal status of the affected populations.




WHERE: Are the CCCs applicable everywhere? Do the CCCs apply in every country?


  • The CCC combine two principles:
  1. universality of children ‘rights: the commitments express the universality of rights for all children. They are based on global standards and norms. Therefore, they are framed to be relevant to all countries and all children. They thus apply to sudden onset crises, protracted crises, complex crises, natural disasters and hazards, in war –affected countries, in middle or high-income countries.
  2. the context-specific response based on need assessments and national capacities: UNICEF’s role in realizing its commitments varies by context. UNICEF scope of action and programming will be adapted to the context and needs, based on a context analysis. Therefore, UNICEF’s scope of action will be adapted depending on context.
  • While the CCCs apply in all contexts, UNICEF’s scope of action and programming will be adapted to the context, based on the analysis of the situation, assessment of humanitarian needs and national capacities. UNICEF implementation modalities may include systems strengthening, through technical assistance, policy development and capacity-building; support for service delivery; direct programme implementation; intervention through operational partners; remote programming; coordination; and advocacy.
  • The fulfilment of the CCCs depends on many factors, including availability of resources (cash, in-kind, technical expertise, core assets); UNICEF presence; partners’ presence, resources and their ability to deliver on the ground; access to affected populations and humanitarian space; and security conditions. In complex emergency situations, UNICEF commits to do the utmost effort to mobilize resources and advocate for humanitarian access to affected populations.

  • The CCCs also apply in situations where UNICEF does not have direct access to affected populations. In this case, UNICEF does its utmost to respond to the protection and humanitarian needs of the affected populations. In cases where UNICEF operates through remote programming and monitoring, UNICEF still engages with communities remotely even when implementation and monitoring are executed through partners and third-party monitors.




HOW issues related to Targeting and Prioritization are reflected in the new CCCs?


  • Identification of populations in need, targeting of communities and locations and prioritization are a core component of Country Offices’ strategic planning processes and day-to-day programmatic decisions. Through the targeting process, UNICEF aims at ensuring that the populations facing the most severe needs and with the worst prospects to meet their needs, are not left behind and are receiving humanitarian assistance.
  • Guiding parameters for the prioritization include: the severity of humanitarian consequences; magnitude (estimated numbers of people in need); likely evolution of the needs; factors causing the needs; people’s own prioritization of their needs; as well as interventions by other actors. Availability of funding, access constraints, security and other operational challenges should not be factored in the targeting and prioritization process. These are considered at a later stage, during the planning and implementation phases, to inform the decision-making and day-to-day management of programmatic priorities by Country Office Senior Management.
  • In the case of a sudden onset or rapid deterioration of a humanitarian crisis, UNICEF prioritizes reaching those most at risk with critical activities such as life-saving interventions.




WHAT do the CCC say about Leaving no one behind / Equity?


  • Equity is highlighted as a guiding principle and key commitment of UNICEF action, in the definition of the CCCs:
  • ‘’The CCCs form the core UNICEF policy and framework for humanitarian action and are mandatory for all UNICEF personnel. Grounded in global humanitarian norms and standards, the CCCs set organizational, programmatic and operational commitments and benchmarks against which UNICEF holds itself accountable for the coverage, quality and equity of its humanitarian action and advocacy.’’

  • Equity is a driving principle of the Targeting and Prioritization, developed in the section on the Implementation of the CCCs in the Chapter 1:

Commitment :Target and reach the most disadvantaged children and their communities with humanitarian assistance, protection and services

Benchmark: All COs develop context-specific approaches for reaching the most vulnerable groups and balance coverage, quality and equity in their humanitarian response planning

  • ‘’The CCCs describe UNICEF commitments to the most disadvantaged children and their families, regardless of the kind of crisis (sudden-onset or protracted emergencies, natural disasters, public health emergencies, complex emergencies such as international or internal armed conflicts, etc), irrespective of the Gross National Income level of the country (low, middle or high) or legal status of the affected populations.
  • The CCCs also apply in situations where UNICEF does not have direct access to affected populations. In this case, UNICEF does its utmost to respond to the protection and humanitarian needs of the affected populations. In cases where UNICEF operates through remote programming and monitoring, UNICEF still engages with communities remotely even when implementation and monitoring are executed through partners and third-party monitors.
  • Identification of populations in need, targeting of communities and locations and prioritization are a core component of Country Offices’ strategic planning processes and day-to-day programmatic decisions. Through the targeting process, UNICEF aims at ensuring that the populations facing the most severe needs and with the worst prospects to meet their needs, are not left behind and are receiving humanitarian assistance.
  • Guiding parameters for the prioritization include: the severity of humanitarian consequences; magnitude (estimated numbers of people in need); likely evolution of the needs; factors causing the needs; people’s own prioritization of their needs; as well as interventions by other actors. Availability of funding, access constraints, security and other operational challenges should not be factored in the targeting and prioritization process. These are considered at a later stage, during the planning and implementation phases, to inform the decision-making and day-to-day management of programmatic priorities by Country Office Senior Management.
In the case of a sudden onset or rapid deterioration of a humanitarian crisis, UNICEF prioritizes reaching those most at risk with critical activities such as life-saving interventions.
  • Equity is an Overarching Commitment which applies across every sector and programme area of the organization. Below is the full extract of the Overarching Commitment
  • UNICEF’s humanitarian response strives to focus on the most disadvantaged communities to realise the rights of every child starting with the most vulnerable [1] and deprived. UNICEF seeks to understand and address the root causes of discrimination and inequity, often exacerbated by emergencies, so that all children and women, particularly those most vulnerable, have safe access to education, health care, nutrition, sanitation, clean water, protection and other services, and have an opportunity to survive, develop and reach their full potential, without discrimination.
  • UNICEF balances reaching the greatest number of people in need (coverage) with reaching those in greatest need (equity), while maintaining the delivery of quality programming[2]. UNICEF prioritizes accessing people who are in greatest need of assistance in a timely and principled manner, particularly in contexts with limited funding. To inform an equity approach, UNICEF collects and uses disaggregated data to understand the different needs of different groups of affected populations, in order to target and reach the most disadvantaged groups.

  • Equity is featured as the 1st commitment of the Needs assessments, planning, monitoring and evaluation Sector, which applies to all Programmes

Commitments:

1: Equity-focused data: Disaggregated data is collected, analysed and disseminated to understand and address the diverse needs, risks and vulnerabilities[1] of children and their communities

Benchmark: Disaggregated data (by age, gender, disability, location and other context-specific considerations) is collected, analysed and disseminated in all assessment, planning, monitoring and evaluation activities

  • Finally, Equity is contextualized for each Sector: Key Considerations on Equity have been systematically developed to contextualize the Equity for every sector, and are hosted under the Key Considerations on Quality Programming and Standards. Some examples include:
  • Health: Focus on the most deprived and hard-to-reach: new-borns, children, adolescents and women, especially in remote rural areas, urban slums and poorest and hard-to-reach communities who are often disproportionally affected by humanitarian crises.
  • Education: Ensure continuation of learning is central to all plans. Special attention should be given to targeting the needs of out-of-school children, girls, children with disabilities, refugees, displaced children and other marginalized or vulnerable groups[4].

[2] Balance coverage, quality and equity: Process which consists in balancing the objective to reach the greatest number of people (coverage)with the objective to reach the people in greatest need (equity), while maintaining quality of programme. This balancing is particularly critical incontexts with limited funding. Coverage is guided by estimates of people in need. Quality is measured against UNICEF and interagencyand IASC standards. Equity is judged by appropriate prioritization of the people most in need, informed by assessment and analysis ofvulnerability and deprivation, and the principle of leaving no child behind.

[3] Vulnerability is the extent to which some people may be disproportionately affected by the disruption of their physical environment and social support mechanisms following disaster or conflict. Vulnerability is specific to each person and each situation. Vulnerable groups are those most exposed to risk, and particularly susceptible to the effects of environmental, economic, social and political shocks and hazards. They may include: children, adolescents, women, older people, pregnant adolescents and women, child and female-headed households, people with disabilities, unaccompanied minors, people from marginalized groups and the poorest of the poor, people marginalized by their society due to their ethnicity, age, gender, sexual identity, disability status, class or caste, political affiliations or religion. The typology of vulnerable groups may evolve depending on contexts and risks.

[4] Vulnerability is the extent to which some people may be disproportionately affected by the disruption of their physical environment and social support mechanisms following disaster or conflict. Vulnerability is specific to each person and each situation. Vulnerable groups are those most exposed to risk, and particularly susceptible to the effects of environmental, economic, social and political shocks and hazards. They may include: children, adolescents, women, older people, pregnant adolescents and women, child and female-headed households, people with disabilities, unaccompanied minors, people from marginalized groups and the poorest of the poor, people marginalized by their society due to their ethnicity, age, gender, sexual identity, disability status, class or caste, political affiliations or religion. The typology of vulnerable groups may evolve depending on contexts and risks.





UNICEF and the CCCs

What is UNICEF’s level of accountability to the CCCs?


  • The CCCs are a Policy defining UNICEF’s accountabilities and obligations in humanitarian action, including by defining programme and operational commitments and benchmarks against which the performance of UNICEF and its partners can be measured. Compliance is mandatory.
  • CCCs are referred in audits, and evaluations
  • The CCCs set out commitments and benchmarks against which UNICEF holds itself accountable for the coverage, quality and equity of its humanitarian action and advocacy. They state the organization’s – and each CO’s – commitment to respond. UNICEF’s Programme CCCs are formulated as benchmarks, and UNICEF is accountable for its own planned contribution to results.
  • The benchmarks are a reference point against which performance or achievements can be assessed, and against which UNICEF’s core accountability and obligations in humanitarian action can be assessed. They represent a result that a sector response should strive to achieve.
  • UNICEF is accountable for working towards meeting benchmarks with cluster partners, which may include advocacy with government and other partners to implement, and advocacy for resources for UNICEF and partners




How does UNICEF plan to monitor and hold oneself accountable on the CCCs?


  • Systematic reference to the CCCs in UNICEF planning and reporting documents supports their implementation and strengthens UNICEF accountability to deliver on the CCCs. UNICEF builds on its existing performance monitoring system[1] to measure progress and report against the CCCs regularly.
  • The CCC refer to the key UNICEF procedures and policies adopted in the last years – for which monitoring, and accountability procedures exist. This includes:
  • Special Measures for Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse,
  • UNICEF’s Policy on Conduct Promoting the Protection and Safeguarding of Children,
  • UNICEF’s Policy Prohibiting and Combatting Fraud and Corruption,
  • Emergency Procedures activated for Level 3 and 2 emergencies,
  • Procedure on Linking Humanitarian and Development,
  • Procedure on Emergency Preparedness, etc.
  • The CCCs are systematically referred to in the existing UNICEF corporate monitoring system. The CCC Indicator Guidance, released as a companion to the CCCs, outlines the alignment and correspondences between the CCCs (Commitments and Benchmarks), the Strategic Plan, and the overall Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation system, and reporting architecture, including the Results Assessment Module (RAM), the Strategic Monitoring Questions (SMQs), the Humanitarian Action for Children (HAC) and the Situation Reports reporting systems.
  • The CCCs are also referred in audits, and evaluations.

[1] Virtual Integrated System of Information (VISION).





UNICEF Partners and the CCCs

What is the role of partners (governments, CSOs) and other external stakeholders in realizing/applying the CCCs?


  • UNICEF works with partners to build an alliance around the Core Commitments for Children. The contribution of all partners (governments, civil society organizations, private sector) is essential in realizing the CCCs.
  • The CCCs are realized through close collaboration with states; national and local authorities; affected populations; civil society organizations (CSOs), including international and national NGOs, community-based organizations, human rights institutions and faith-based organizations; the UN system, including its operational funds, agencies and programmes; donors; academic and research institutions; the private sector; and the media.
  • At country level, UNICEF establishes partnerships with host governments, CSOs, communities and the private sector for programme implementation. The fulfilment of the CCCs is closely linked to UNICEF’s operational partners’ ability to deliver on the ground. The operational commitments (Chapter 3) describe UNICEF’s accountabilities to enable the timely delivery of humanitarian assistance by UNICEF and its partners.




How the role and contribution of partners (who are the major implementers of the CCCs) is featured in the CCCs?


  • A section on Partnership for Program Implementation in Chapter 1 section 1.2.3 Partnerships acknowledging the critical role played by partners, their role as advocacy allies, technical expert, local experts and UNICEF commitments to Principles of Partnerships (PoP)
  • UNICEF commitment to effective Partnership practice is explicitly reflected in Chapter 1 section 1.2.3 Partnerships, Section 1.5.5 Institutional Responsibilities (at HQ, RO, CO level), as well as in 3.5 Partnerships
  • The section 3.5 Partnerships has been beefed up with reference to UNICEF Commitments in the frame of the PCAs[1]
  • Partnerships and Collaboration with key partners for results is reflected in Key Considerations of All Programme Commitments
  • All Operational Commitments reflect UNICEF commitments to partners: 3.1 Admin Fin, 3.2 Human Resources, 3.4 Communication and Advocacy section on 3.5 Partnerships, 3.7 Security 3.8 Supply. Ex: The Security section describes UNICEF support to partners to set up establish their Security Risk Management Framework and comply to their Duty of Care responsibilities

[1] In the case of Partnerships for programme implementation, when signing a PCA (Programme Cooperation Agreement) with partner, UNICEF commits to contribute to the implementation of each Programme Document covered by the Agreement by:

  • Commencing and completing the responsibilities allocated to it in the Programme Document in a timely manner, provided that all necessary reports and other documents are available;
  • Making transfers of cash, supplies and equipment in accordance with the provisions of the Agreement;
  • Undertaking and completing monitoring, assessment, assurance activities, evaluation and oversight of the Programme Document;
  • Liaising on an ongoing basis, as needed, with the Government (as applicable), other members of the United Nations Country Team, donors, and other stakeholders; and
  • Providing overall guidance, oversight, technical assistance and leadership, as appropriate, for the implementation of the Programme Document, and making itself available for consultations as reasonably requested; and
  • Initiating joint monitoring and review meetings that shall be held at least at mid-term and at the end of the Programme Document in order to agree on the resolution of findings and to build on lessons learned to better serve the needs of children. The joint partnership review shall take into account: (a) the progress of the Programme Document; (b) working relationship of the Parties; (c) the compliance of the Parties with this Agreement; and (d) the success and challenges of the IP in meeting the agreed objectives and desired results of the Programme Document.




What is the level of obligation and accountability of partners (CSOs) to the CCCs?


  • Partners are guided by the global norms, standards and principles of intervention described in the CCCs. CSOs, have agreed to commit to the global norms and standards that also guide the CCCs. It includes: Core Humanitarian Standards, Sphere[1] , Minimum Standards for Education in Emergencies INEE MSEE[2][3], Child Protection Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Action (CPMS).
  • The Programme Cooperation Agreement (PCA) and associated Programme Documents signed at country level contribute to the fulfilment of the CCCs, and to the achievement of the Programmatic Commitments described in the CCCs.
  • Partners are accountable for delivering the expected results and using funds and resources allocated, as described in the frame of the Programme Cooperation Agreement (PCA) and Programme Documents signed with UNICEF. This includes detailed activities, timeframes and budget.
  • When signing a PCA and Programme documents with UNICEF, CSO commits to:
  • undertake the activities described in the document, according to the expected results, detailed activities, timeframes and budget
  • display the highest standard of conduct in ensuring that the core values of the United Nations, the Convention on the Rights of the Child,
  • provide the reports required under this Agreement in a timely manner and satisfactory to UNICEF
  • establish and maintain a system for monitoring progress of the implementation of the Programme Document using the defined results, including outputs, indicators and targets as set out in the Programme Document.
  • take all appropriate measures to prevent sexual exploitation and abuse, and child safeguarding violations, by its employees, personnel or subcontractors promptly and confidentially, in a manner that assures the safety of all involved, report allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse, or any reasonable suspicion (or allegations) of child safeguarding violations.

[1] The Sphere Project, www.sphereproject.org

[2] Inter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies, Minimum Standards for Education in Emergencies

[3] In addition, the IASC guidelines for addressing HIV In humanitarian settings.





Governments / Member States and the CCCs

What is the role and obligation of states vis a vis the CCCs?


  • States remain the primary duty bearers for the respect, promotion and realization of children’s rights. They bear the primary responsibility for responding to a crisis, providing assistance to the victims and facilitating the work of humanitarian actors, including through mobilization of domestic and international resources and use of national systems and capacities.
  • UNICEF contributes to these efforts by mobilizing national and international resources through its technical expertise, coordination and advocacy.
  • States can use the CCCs to inform their humanitarian action and guide their efforts to meet the needs and protect the rights of affected populations. The member states can also refer to the CCCs to understand how UNICEF and its partners can contribute and support the relief efforts.
  • The CCCs are thus also an advocacy tool for engaging with governments and other stakeholders.




What is the level of accountability of the governments vis a vis the CCCs? How does UNICEF plan to hold governments who receive funds from UNICEF, accountable?


  • Governments are expected to respect and promote the international instruments and norms and standard that guide the CCCs, including:
  • International human rights law, in particular the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC),
  • International Humanitarian Law,
  • Humanitarian Principles,
  • General Assembly Resolutions, Relevant Security Council resolutions.

  • States remain the primary duty bearers for the respect, promotion and realization of children’s rights. They bear the primary responsibility for responding to a crisis, taking care of the victims and facilitating the work of humanitarian actors, including through mobilization of domestic and international resources and utilization of national systems.

  • When receiving funds from UNICEF for programme implementation, Governments are accountable for results and use of funds and resources allocated in the frame of the partnership (which contributes to the CCCs and has been designed with the CCCs) signed at country office level.




How the Member States can support the CCCs?


  • UNICEF works with partners to build an alliance around the Core Commitments for Children. The contribution of all partners (governments, civil society organizations, private sector) is essential in realizing the CCCs.

  • The CCCs can be used as a reference and a tool for Member States to bear their primary responsibility for responding to a crisis, mobilizing national systems, raising domestic and international resources, and promoting the realization of children’s rights. The member states can also refer to the CCCs to understand how UNICEF and its partners can contribute and support the relief efforts.

  • The Members States and Executive Board members can support the fulfilment of the CCCs via:

- an active high-level advocacy on child rights and humanitarian action

- an active support to capacity building efforts of UNICEF and partners

- the resource mobilization of quality and multi-year funding

- holding UNICEF accountable on the CCCs.





Monitoring and Reporting on Humanitarian Action

How does UNICEF plan to monitor the CCCs?


  • The CCCs are fundamental to UNICEF’s planning, monitoring and evaluation architecture and guide UNICEF’s contribution to the interagency Humanitarian Programme Cycle.
  • Systematic reference to the CCCs in UNICEF planning and reporting documents supports their implementation and strengthens UNICEF accountability to deliver on the CCCs. UNICEF builds on its existing performance monitoring system[1] to measure progress and report against the CCCs regularly.
  • The benchmarks in the CCCs are a reference point against which performance or achievements can be assessed, against which UNICEF’s core accountability and obligations in humanitarian action can be assessed. They represent an end result that a sector response should strive to achieve. Each benchmark will have corresponding indicators (from HAC or Sitreps).
  • The new CCC are integrated/ mainstreamed into UNICEF Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation (PME) and reporting instruments. This systematic reference to the CCC sin all planning and reporting documents supports UNICEF systematic implementation and strengthens UNICEF accountability to deliver on the CCCs.
    • The new CCCs are released with a CCC Indicator Guidance, companion to the CCCs, providing a compendium of indicators that outlines the alignment between the CCCs (Commitments and Benchmarks), the Strategic Plan, and the overall Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation system, as well as the reporting architecture, including the Results Assessment Module (RAM), the Strategic Monitoring Questions (SMQs), the Humanitarian Action for Children (HAC) and the Situation Reports reporting systems.
    • The CCCs and the Indicator Guidance will be used as a programming reference and planning tool by the Country Offices in their planning (CPD, HAC) and reporting cycles (Situation Reports, Annual Reports). This will allow a streamlined and systematic reporting against the CCCs in UNICEF Annual reports.
    • The CCCs are also reflected in the key UNICEF planning documents, including in the Strategic Plan. They also guide UNICEF contributions to Inter-Agency Humanitarian planning cycle.
  • The CCCs are also referred in audits, and evaluations.

[1] Virtual Integrated System of Information (VISION).




Is UNICEF going to report annually against the CCCs?


  • UNICEF already reports annually against the CCC Framework via the Annual Results Report (ARR) on Humanitarian Action,
    • ARR is released, every year, to supplement the Executive Director Annual Report (EDAR), UNICEF’s official accountability document. It used to be an Annex; it is now presented as a stand-alone document which supplements the EDAR.
    • AAR is organized, every year, around the Commitments Framework of the CCCs (reporting against Commitments, not benchmarks) and the Strategic Plan.

  • The new CCC are reflected in UNICEF planning, monitoring, evaluation and reporting instruments, to ensure UNICEF systematic implementation and to strengthen its accountability to deliver on the CCCs.
    • The CCCs are reflected in the key UNICEF planning documents, including in the Strategic Plan, and the Country Programme Documents.
    • The CCCs also guide UNICEF contributions to Inter-Agency Humanitarian planning cycle.
    • The new CCCs will be released with a compendium of indicators that will allow a full alignment between the CCCs (Commitments and Benchmarks), the Strategic Plan, and the overall Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation system, as well as the reporting architecture, including the Humanitarian Action for Children (HAC) and the SitRep reporting systems. This will allow a streamlined and systematic reporting against the CCCs in UNICEF Annual reports.




Will the EDAR report against the CCCs?


  • The Executive Director Annual Report (EDAR): This report includes formal reporting on the Strategic Plan, but not on the CCCs. The revision of the CCCs could provide a momentum to better align this document with the key commitments outlined in the CCCs.




Will the AR to the Executive Board report against the CCCs?


  • The Annual Report on UNICEF’s Humanitarian Action presented to the Executive Board
    • For 3 years, UNICEF has started to present to the Executive Board an Annual Report on UNICEF’s Humanitarian Action.
    • So far, three reports have been presented to the Executive Board, covering the years 2017, 2018 and 2019. None of them is organized around the CCCs.
    • For the 2020 Annual Report to the Executive Board, that will be released in June 2021, we plan to abide by the Executive Board Request and to include elements of reporting on both the Strategic Plan and the new CCCs.





Grand Bargain Commitments

Are the Grand Bargain commitments reflected in the CCCs?


  • All Grand Bargain commitments are reflected in the CCCs, including through the reference to policies and the definition of specific commitments supported by measurable benchmarks on:
    • joint and impartial needs assessments
    • linking humanitarian and development resources and programing
    • localization
    • AAP
    • humanitarian cash transfers




How the Linking Humanitarian and Development is reflected in the new CCCs?


  • The CCCs include an explicit and overarching commitment/programme approach to foster coherence and complementarity between humanitarian and development programming. The CCCs also include explicit strategies to link humanitarian and development programming, partnerships, funding, and coordination systems.

  • Linking humanitarian and development is featured as an Overarching Commitment which applies across every sector and programme area of the organization:

  • Commitment: Foster coherence and complementarity between humanitarian and development programming

  • Benchmark: All COs, with the support of ROs/HQ, design and implement risk-informed and conflict-sensitive humanitarian programmes that build and strengthen national and local capacities and systems from the start of humanitarian action to reduce needs, vulnerabilities of and risks to affected populations; and contribute to social cohesion and peace, where relevant and feasible

All COs must implement risk-informed and conflict-sensitive programming that build and strengthen national and local capacities and systems to reduce needs, vulnerabilities of and risks to affected populations. This includes:

  • Responding to emergencies in a way that strengthens existing national and local capacities and systems, helping to safeguard women and children’s rights and deliver essential services to the most vulnerable and marginalized through:

  • Investing in the organizational and institutional capacity of national and local actors, including national and local authorities, CSOs, and the private sector

  • Strengthening national and local service delivery and management systems, including building the readiness and resilience of national social protection systems

  • Strengthening capacities of communities, particularly women, adolescents and children

  • Strengthening the leadership and coordination of humanitarian response by local communities and authorities

  • Identifying and analysing risks, shocks and stresses and implementing risk-informed and conflict-sensitive programming that:

  • Plans for the impact of shocks and stresses through appropriate preparedness measures to avoid possible disruptions to service delivery

  • Is designed to avoid exacerbating conflict and violence (i.e. conflict-sensitive)

  • Improves national and local capacities for disaster risk reduction, including sustainable climate change adaption

UNICEF’s Procedure on Linking Humanitarian and Development Programming makes these strategies mandatory for all COs.

  • The LHD/nexus is also further described and contextualized throughout the CCCs in:

  • Programmatic Commitments: Nutrition, Health, WASH, Education, Child Protraction and Social Protection all contain one commitment and benchmark on system strengthening. Ex Health

  • Key Consideration of every sector

  • Operational Commitments – examples below

Resource Mobilization: Linking Humanitarian and Development resources

  • In addition to earmarked funding, strategic investments are made from UNICEF Thematic Pools to support preparedness, humanitarian response and activities related to system-strengthening and resilience-building

  • Localization of humanitarian and development programming is supported through multi-year, predictable and flexible funding. Systems are in place to track, monitor and report on these investments

Supply and Logistics: Sustainable procurement, supply and logistics arrangements

  • Sustainable procurement, supply and logistics arrangements (contracts, agreements and/or plans) are made available at the onset of the emergency

  • Local/regional sourcing is identified and prioritized

  • In-country logistics service arrangements (customs clearance, warehousing, transport) are identified and established, including collaboration with partners




What do the CCCs say about Localization? (Grand bargain commitment)


Localisation is featured as an Overarching Commitment which applies across every sector and programme area of the organization and reads as follows: Commitment Invest in strengthening the capacities of local actors (national and local authorities, CSOs and communities) in humanitarian action Benchmark All COs, with the support of ROs/HQ, invest in strengthening institutional and technical capacity of local actors to deliver principled humanitarian response

UNICEF invests in the institutional and technical capacity of local actors (authorities, CSOs, communities and private sector), to better address the needs of children affected by humanitarian crisis and to prepare national and sub-national actors for future humanitarian responses. UNICEF commits to localizing its humanitarian response by recognizing, respecting and strengthening the leadership and coordination of humanitarian action by national and local authorities, CSOs, and communities. UNICEF achieves localization by engaging in principled partnership, adopting comprehensive risk management and, where possible, supporting multi-year agreements and funding. See: 1.2.3 and 3.5 Partnerships; 2.1.1 Preparedness; 2.1.2 Coordination; 2.1.6 AAP; 2.1.3 and 3.8 Supply and logistics; 2.2.1 Quality of programmes; 2.2.4 Linking humanitarian and development; 3.1 Administration and finance; and 3.6 Resource mobilisation.

Localisation is also further developed in the Commitments and Key considerations of:

  • Programmatic Commitments: Preparedness; Coordination; AAP; Quality of programmes; Linking humanitarian and development; and in all Programmatic Sectors (Nutrition, Health, HIV, WASH, Child Protection, Education, Social Protection, Adolescents, Disabilities, Gender, ECD, Public Health Emergencies, Large scale Movements of populations)
  • Operational Commitments:
Commitments:

Resource Mobilization: Linking humanitarian and development resources;

Integration of humanitarian and development resources is enhanced.

Benchmarks:

  • Strategic investments are made from UNICEF thematic pools to support preparedness, humanitarian response and activities related to system-strengthening and resilience-building.
  • Localisation of humanitarian and development programming is supported through multi-year, predictable and flexible funding. Systems are in place to track, monitor and report on these investments
Commitments:

Supply: Sustainable procurement, supply and logistics arrangements

Sustainable procurement, supply and logistics arrangements (contracts, agreements and/or plans) are made available at the onset or deterioration of a humanitarian crisis.

Benchmarks:

  • Local/regional sourcing is identified and prioritised
  • Sea/road shipments are prioritised for offshore procurement following the first wave of deliveries.
  • In-country logistics service arrangements (customs clearance, warehousing, transport) are identified and established, including collaboration with partners

Key consideration Partnerships: Localize UNICEF’s humanitarian response through collaboration with local actors (authorities, CSOs, communities, private sector) and build their capacity. Leverage their access to local populations and critical knowledge of the local context and people. Actively seek out and partner with local women’s, adolescent and children’s organizations/groups.




How cash transfers are reflected in the new CCCs? (Grand bargain commitment)


Cash transfers are an overarching commitment

Commitment:

Promote unconditional and unrestricted humanitarian cash transfers

Benchmark:

All COs, with the support of ROs/HQ, promote the use of unconditional and unrestricted humanitarian cash transfers, whenever relevant and feasible;

  • Alongside other modalities, UNICEF is committed to assessing the feasibility of cash transfers in every humanitarian response in coordination and agreement with other humanitarian actors. All COs must assess the feasibility of cash transfers in a timely and efficient manner in accordance with the UNICEF Procedure on Preparedness for Emergency Response or during the response.
  • Humanitarian cash transfers are a flexible assistance modality which helps meet the survival and recovery needs of the most vulnerable children and families; contributes to multisectoral response through addressing immediate basic needs; gives families flexibility to make their own choices and supports local markets. Cash transfers can also contribute to the delivery of sector-specific objectives through the design of cash plus approaches.
  • As the context evolves, all COs must update and adapt their approach to humanitarian cash transfers, maintaining minimum ethical and safety standards around the collection, use and sharing of data.
  • While a range of implementation models can be used to implement cash transfer programmes, UNICEF first considers the possible use of existing national social protection systems. When this is not feasible or not aligned with humanitarian principles, UNICEF uses or sets up an alternative system of implementation through partnerships with other UN agencies, international financial institutions, international and local NGOs, the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and the private sector.




How Accountability to Affected Populations (AAP) is reflected in the new CCCs? (Grand bargain commitment)


  • Accountability to Affected Populations is developed as a core policy in the chapter 1:UNICEF, in accordance with the IASC and the CHS definition of AAP, aims to ensure that all vulnerable, at-risk and crisis-affected populations supported through its humanitarian action are able to hold UNICEF to account for promoting and protecting their rights and generating effective results for them, taking into account their needs, concerns and preferences, and working in ways that enhance their dignity, capacities and resilience.
  • Accountability to Affected Populations is featured as an Overarching Commitment which applies across every sector and programme area of the organization:
Commitment: Ensure that affected children and families participate in the decisions that affect their lives, are properly informed and consulted, and have their views acted upon. Benchmarks:

All COs, with the support of ROs/HQ, establish processes to ensure that Affected and at-risk populations, including children and women:

  • Participate in humanitarian planning processes and in decisions that affect their lives
  • Are informed about their rights and entitlements, expected standards of conduct by UNICEF personnel, available services, and how to access them through their preferred language and methods of communication, as per the Sphere standards
  • Have their feedback systematically collected and used to inform programme design and course correction  See 2.3.1 Needs assessments, planning, monitoring and evaluation
  • Have access to safe and confidential complaint mechanisms

UNICEF is committed to putting affected populations, including children, women and the most vulnerable[1] groups, at the centre of its work.[2] UNICEF facilitates the safe, appropriate and equitable engagement of communities by:

  • Promoting the participation of communities in decisions on defining and prioritising interventions and determining the most appropriate delivery mechanisms
  • Providing access to life-saving information, including on affected people's rights and how to exercise them, and appropriate two-way communication channels between aid providers and communities
  • Providing secure means for affected communities to provide feedback and complain about programmes and responses, while regularly collecting, analysing and integrating this information into decision-making processes
  • AAP is also further described and contextualized throughout the CCCs in the Programmatic Commitments and Key Considerations of Nutrition, Health, WASH, Education, Child Protraction and Social Protection

[1] Vulnerable groups are those most exposed to risk, and particularly susceptible to the effects of environmental, economic, social and political shocks and hazards. Vulnerable groups may include: children, adolescents, women, older people, pregnant adolescents and women, child and female-headed households, people with disabilities, unaccompanied minors, people from marginalized groups and the poorest of the poor, people marginalized by their society due to their ethnicity, age, gender, sexual identity, disability status, class or caste, political affiliations or religion. The typology of vulnerable groups may evolve depending on contexts and risks.

[2] See UNICEF, Accountability to Affected Populations Handbook (draft), 2019.





Preparedness, Coordination

How Preparedness is reflected in the new CCCs?


The CCCs must be used by every Country Office (CO) as a framework to monitor the situation of women and children and take appropriate preparedness and response measures, in order to deliver predictable, timely, principled and child-centred humanitarian response.

Preparedness is an institutional responsibility: All UNICEF senior managers at Headquarters (HQ), Regional Office (RO), Country Office (CO) and Field Office (FO) are responsible and held accountable for:

  • Implementing and enforcing the CCCs as the framework for preparedness and humanitarian response

  • Mobilizing technical expertise and resources (human, material, financial) to support ROs and COs in their preparedness and response efforts

  • Providing strategic and technical guidance to ROs and COs in their preparedness and emergency efforts,

  • Monitoring regional risks and defining regional strategies and plans for preparedness and emergency response; reviewing and guiding COs on their risk assessment and management

  • Providing guidance and direct support to COs on their preparedness and emergency response, resources, budget, fundraising and use of emergency procedures

  • Leveraging regional partnerships for emergency preparedness and response; establishing alliances with donors and mobilizing multi-year and flexible resources on behalf of COs

  • Preparedness is featured as an Overarching Commitment which applies across every sector and programme area of the organization and reads as follows:

Commitment:

Improve humanitarian response through investing in preparedness with a focus on enabling effective and timely response, reducing costs and reaching the most vulnerable.

Benchmark:

All COs, ROs and HQ meet the Minimum Preparedness Standards (MPS) as per the UNICEF Procedure on Preparedness for Emergency Response and the Guidance Note on Preparedness for Emergency Response in UNICEF

Preparedness consists of the mechanisms and systems put in place in advance to enable an effective and timely humanitarian response to humanitarian crises, based on an analysis of the risks in a particular context, and taking into account national and regional capacities and UNICEF’s comparative advantage. It is part of risk-informed programming and contributes to linking humanitarian and development programming.

UNICEF builds national and local capacities for preparedness and response, ensures UNICEF offices’ preparedness to respond, including through internal capacity development, and contributes to interagency preparedness[1]. The combination of these elements varies according to context.

The UNICEF Procedure on Preparedness for Emergency Response requires all COs to complete/review at least every 12 months a four-step preparedness planning process using the Emergency Preparedness Platform (EPP) (risk analysis, scenario definition, key elements of UNICEF response, preparedness actions) to prepare to respond to their priority hazards.

The procedure also sets Minimum Preparedness Standards (MPS) for COs, ROs and HQ. These are mandatory standards for every Office, designed to significantly increase UNICEF’s preparedness for humanitarian response.

  • Preparedness is also further contextualized throughout the CCCs in the Programmatic Commitments and Key Considerations of Nutrition, Health, WASH, Education, Child Protraction and Social Protection,
  • Preparedness is also contextualized in the Operational Commitments as follows:

Human resources:

UNICEF personnel have appropriate knowledge of emergency preparedness and response

  • Personnel complete applicable mandatory training and have access to supplementary training/learning on emergency preparedness and response

Partnerships:

Humanitarian programmes and partnerships are identified in advance through contingency planning and preparedness measures

  • An up-to-date mapping of current and prospective government and civil society partners is maintained at country, regional and global levels
  • Contingency planning and partnerships are established with governments and CSOs in higher-risk countries, with simple activation protocols for rapid operationalization[1]

Mobilisation of adequate and quality resources:

Adequate and quality resources are mobilized in a timely and predictable manner to support preparedness and response to humanitarian and protection needs, particularly of the most vulnerable populations

  • Multi-year, predictable and flexible[1] funding is mobilized from private and public sectors to reduce the gap between humanitarian needs and the resources available to meet them
  • Funding is secured to support preparedness for faster, timely and more cost-effective responses
  • Internal funding mechanisms (Emergency Programme Fund and Thematic Funding) are used to rapidly respond and scale up programmes

Linking humanitarian and development resources:

Integration of humanitarian and development resources is enhanced

  • Strategic investments are made from UNICEF thematic pools to support preparedness, humanitarian response and activities related to system-strengthening and resilience-building
  • Localization of humanitarian and development programming is supported through multi-year, predictable and flexible funding. Systems are in place to track, monitor and report on these investments

Supply and Logistics:

Supply and logistics preparedness measures are in place at global, regional and country levels, including prepositioning of supplies and contractual arrangements for logistics services and more commonly requested goods

  • Emergency supplies are kept available in Supply Division hubs and/or suppliers’ premises, and/or at RO/CO level, including in some cases in governments’ or partners’ warehouses
  • Long-term or contractual arrangements for procurement of emergency supplies and logistics services are in place at global, regional and country levels
  • National and local capacity to segment and out-source supply chain services to the private sector is improved.

[1] Flexible funds include regular resources (funds contributed without restrictions on their use) and thematic resources (funding allocated against thematic pools; donors contribute thematic funding against the humanitarian appeal, at global, regional or country level).

[1] See Guidance for CSOs on Partnership with UNICEF

[1] Reflected in the country’s Programme Strategy Notes, Programme Document and Programme Management Plan.




How UNICEF role in Coordination   is reflected in the new CCCs?


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Coordination is featured as an Overarching Commitment which applies across every sector and programme area of the organization:

Commitment:

Support the leadership and coordination of humanitarian response, along with national and local stakeholders, and in compliance with humanitarian principles

Benchmark:

UNICEF, at CO/RO/HQ level, actively contributes to intersectoral coordination and ensures that sectors/clusters under its leadership are adequately staffed and skilled  See 2.3 Sectoral commitments.

As a member of the IASC, UNICEF is committed to support humanitarian coordination[1] along with national and local stakeholders (including national and local authorities, CSOs, and communities) and to improve the collective impact of humanitarian response. Whether the cluster approach is activated or not, UNICEF plays a key role in both global and country-level interagency coordination for its areas of programmatic responsibility.

Where clusters are not activated, UNICEF is accountable for its respective sectors to support coordination mechanisms. This includes supporting coordination functions, the development of assessment and information management systems and tools, capacity-building and prepositioning of supplies.

Where clusters are activated, as Cluster Lead Agency (CLA) for Nutrition, WASH, Education[1], and Child Protection Area of Responsibility (AoR) within the Protection Cluster, UNICEF is committed to fulfil the six core functions defined by the IASC:

  1. Support service delivery by providing a coordination platform to prevent gaps or duplications
  2. Inform strategic decision-making by the Humanitarian Coordinator (HC) and the Humanitarian Coordination Team (HCT) for the humanitarian response through coordination of needs assessment, gap analysis and prioritisation
  3. Develop strategies and plans in accordance with standards and funding needs
  4. Advocate to address concerns on behalf of cluster/sector members and the affected population
  5. Monitor and report on the cluster/sector strategy and results, recommending corrective action where necessary
  6. Support contingency planning/preparedness/national capacity-building where needed

In doing so, UNICEF pays specific attention to:

  • Establish, lead and manage effective coordination mechanisms with all relevant partners, and provide adequate human and financial resources for cluster/sector coordination and information management responsibilities
  • Establish standards of quality, predictability, accountability and partnership, in accordance with global norms and standards
  • Provide technical support and guidance to cluster/sector members and promote quality and global humanitarian standards, including on child rights, gender and protection mainstreaming
  • Ensure strong links with development coordination bodies and processes to ensure that humanitarian and development approaches are aligned with national development objectives and that steps are taken to strengthen national preparedness and response capacity
  • Promote principled humanitarian action and humanitarian principles, especially in conflict affected contexts
  • Promote the participation of local and national NGOs in the cluster/sector system

Furthermore, as the Provider of Last Resort, when and where necessary, and depending on access, security and availability of funding, UNICEF is committed to take appropriate measures for the provision of services required to fill critical gaps identified by the cluster/sector group and reflected in the Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP). When access, security and/or funding are not sufficient, UNICEF, as the cluster/sector lead agency, is committed to raise these issues with the HC or Emergency Relief Coordinator for urgent attention and/or advocacy, as per the IASC Guidance on Provider of Last Resort.

In case of the activation of a IASC Humanitarian System-Wide Scale-Up Activation Protocol and related IASC Empowered Leadership Protocol, UNICEF is committed to take appropriate measures to adapt and scale-up its response modalities for interagency response to meet populations needs.

Coordination is also further contextualized throughout the CCCs in the:
  • Roles and Responsibilities of HQ Division Directors, Regional Directors, CO Representatives and Chiefs of Field Offices, as well as National committees (See Institutional Responsibilities)
  • Programmatic Commitments of all Programmes: Nutrition, Health, HIV, WASH, Education, Child Protraction and Social Protection all contain one standalone commitment on Coordination.
  • Key Considerations of every Programmatic Commitments sector: PME, Nutrition, Health, WASH, Education, Child Protraction, Social Protection, as well as ADAP, Disabilities, Gender, ECD, and Situation Specific Commitments: Public Health Emergencies, Large movement of Populations.
  • Key Considerations of the Operational Commitments

[1] UNICEF is the Cluster Lead Agency at country-level and the co-lead at the Global Level, through a MoU with Save the Children

[1] United Nations, General Assembly Resolution, ‘Strengthening of the Coordination of Humanitarian Emergency Assistance of the United Nations’, A/RES/46/182.





Quality Programming

How the issue of quality is reflected in the new CCCs?


Quality of Programmes is featured as an Overarching Commitment which applies across every sector and programme area of the organization and reads as follows:

Commitment:

Design and implement high quality programming

Benchmark:

All COs, with the support of ROs/HQ, design and implement results-based humanitarian responses that are informed by humanitarian principles and human rights, meet global norms and standards, and contribute to strengthening local capacity and systems.

UNICEF works with its partners to design and implement programmes that:

  • Are informed by international legal frameworks, humanitarian principles and human rights, put children’s rights at the centre of programming and mainstream the protection of children, women and affected populations in all sectors  See 1.3 International legal framework and 1.4.5 Centrality of protection
  • Are in line with global norms and standards, including the Sphere standards, CHS, INEE and CPMS  See 1.4 Global standards and principles
  • Target the most disadvantaged children, women and communities  See 2.2.3 Equity
  • Foster multisectoral programming, geographic convergence and an integrated approach for sustainable and at-scale outcomes  See 2.2.2 Multisectoral and integrated programming
  • Are safe and accessible
  • Are results-based, contribute to collective outcomes and are founded on evidence, analysis and needs assessments
  • Are based on communication with, participation of and feedback from affected populations, including women and children
  • Are gender-responsive, age-sensitive and inclusive
  • Are conflict-sensitive, avoid negative effects, and are informed by a robust child-sensitive risk and conflict analysis, taking into consideration protection risks and potential violations
  • Contribute to strengthening national and local systems and capacities of national and local actors (authorities and CSOs), reduce vulnerabilities and risks, build resilience and social cohesion and lay the foundation for recovery and sustainable development, including environmental considerations, by integrating climate adaptation and disaster risk reduction
  • In addition, key considerations of all sectors include links to Guidance on Quality, and benchmarks refer to indicator on quality of humanitarian programmes.




How the Multi-sectoral and Integrated programming is reflected in the new CCCs?


Multi-sectoral and Integrated programming is

  • an overarching commitment which explicitly commits all sectors and UNICEF as an organization, accompanied with benchmarks + examples of multi-sectoral programmes conducted at scale for all the major responses (malnutrition, outbreaks etc.)

Commitment:

Foster multisectoral/integrated programming and geographic convergence at all phases of the programme cycle

Benchmark:

All COs promote multisectoral and integrated programming, as well as geographic convergence, when designing and implementing programmes and partnerships

UNICEF fosters multisectoral/integrated approach and geographic convergence in the design and implementation of its programmes and partnerships. Sector leads are encouraged to operate in the same geographic locations; coordinate the planning, financing and implementation of programmes jointly; contribute to each other’s goals and results, in order to deliver more sustainable, cost-effective and at-scale outcomes[1].

This applies to all phases of the programme response cycle: needs assessments; planning, design of partnerships; programme implementation; support to service delivery; capacity-building; coordination; field monitoring and evaluation.

Multi-sectoral and Integrated programming is also:

  • featured in all Programme Commitments + Benchmarks (Needs assessment /Planning/Evaluation, Health, HIV, Nutrition, WASH, CP, Education, Social Protection)
  • featured as the first Key Considerations of all sectors (Needs assessment /Planning/Evaluation, Health, HIV, Nutrition, WASH, CP, Education, Social Protection) under the section: Quality Programming and Standards
  • featured through the Cross-cutting Sectoral Commitments, which explicitly commits all sectors (Health, Nutrition, WASH, CP, Education, Social Protection) and UNICEF as an organization: C4D, Gender, Disabilities, ECD, ADAP, but also under Centrality of Protection/Protection mainstreaming.

[1] Examples of multi-sectoral and integrated programming include the combining of Health, Nutrition, WASH, Child Protection, ECD and HIV for

severe acute malnutrition (SAM) treatment; the combining of Health, WASH and Community engagement for behaviour and social change for

the response to disease outbreaks; the combining of Education and WASH for menstrual health and hygiene in schools; and of Education and

Child Protection for mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS).




What do the CCCs say about Community Engagement?


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Community engagement for behaviour and social change[1] is featured as an Overarching Commitment which applies across every sector and programme area of the organization and reads as follows:

Commitment:

Implement community engagement for behaviour and social change in collaboration with national and local actors

Benchmark:

All COs, with the support of ROs/HQ, design and implement humanitarian programmes with a planned and resourced component on community engagement for behaviour and social change

UNICEF safely engages and mobilizes communities to foster positive and measurable behaviour and social change and puts people at the centre of humanitarian programmes. UNICEF integrates community engagement, behaviour and social change into humanitarian preparedness and response by including a planned and resourced component, designed and implemented with national and local partners and adapted to each context[2], with a focus on:

  • Providing life-saving information and information on rights and entitlements, services available and how to access them

  • Supporting the adoption of healthy and protective behaviour, including psychosocial self-care practices

  • Conducting rapid assessments, social and behavioural research to inform response activities

  • Creating community engagement platforms or converting existing ones for the purpose of the response

  • Supporting the scale-up of community-based interventions for the purpose of the response

  • Building engagement and interpersonal capacity of frontline workers

  • Supporting the participation of all affected and at-risk populations in intervention design and feedback  See 2.1.6 AAP

  • Promoting peacebuilding and social cohesion activities (including coexistence between displaced populations and host communities)  See 2.2.4 Linking Humanitarian Development and Peace

  • Helping build trust with local actors to secure humanitarian access to intervention areas

Where relevant, UNICEF leads or contributes to the coordination of stakeholders implementing community engagement, behaviour and social change interventions.

See Commitments on Community engagement for behaviour and social change in 2.3 Sectoral commitments, 2.4 Cross-sectoral commitments and 2.5.1 Public health emergencies (PHE)

  • Community Engagement is also further contextualized throughout the CCCs in the:

  • Programmatic Commitments of all Programmes: Nutrition, Health, HIV, WASH, Education, Child Protraction and Social Protection all contain one standalone commitment on Community Engagement.

  • Key Considerations of every Programmatic Commitments sector: PME, Nutrition, Health, WASH, Education, Child Protraction, Social Protection, as well as ADAP, Disabilities, Gender, ECD, and Situation Specific Commitments: Public Health Emergencies, Large movement of Populations.

[1] Also known as Communication for Development (C4D).

[2] See UNICEF Minimum Quality Standards and Indicators in Community Engagement, 2020

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How the Environment is reflected in the new CCCs?


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Environmental sustainability and climate change is featured as an Overarching Commitment which applies across every sector and programme area of the organization:

Commitment:

Incorporate environmental sustainability into the design and delivery of UNICEF’s humanitarian action and strengthen communities’ resilience to climate change

Benchmark:

All COs, with the support of ROs/HQ, design humanitarian programmes that integrate environmental and climate risk, prioritise approaches that minimize harm to the environment and contribute to building resilience, whenever relevant and feasible

UNICEF is committed to reducing the risk and impact of environmental degradation and climate change upon children and providing them with a safe and clean environment. In the delivery of its humanitarian action, UNICEF assesses its impact upon the environment and takes steps to minimize emissions, pollution and waste.

At Country Office level, humanitarian action is informed by a mandatory assessment of climatic and environmental risks, part of the Procedure on Linking Humanitarian and Development Programming, mandatory for all COs. Solutions designed in consultation with the community build resilience to future environmental stresses and promote low-carbon and pollution approaches. UNICEF works with national and local authorities to promote and implement environmentally sustainable and climate-resilient solutions.





Advocacy and Protection

How UNICEF role in Advocacy is reflected in the new CCCs?


The CCCs aim at equipping UNICEF and its partners to deliver principled, timely, quality and child-centred humanitarian response and advocacy in any crises with humanitarian consequences. They are shaped to be used as a communication and advocacy instrument with every stakeholder. They highlight that UNICEF is mandated to promote and protect the rights of all children, guided primarily by the CRC and its Optional Protocols, as well as IHL. The CCCs state that UNICEF conducts humanitarian advocacy to:

  • Facilitate the delivery of humanitarian assistance
  • Secure unimpeded and principled humanitarian access to populations in need
  • Promote adherence to international and regional legal norms, standards and principles
  • Promote accountability of perpetrators of child rights violations
  • Raise international and national awareness of the situation of children and of humanitarian and protection needs, particularly of the most vulnerable
  • Trigger rights-based and equitable development and strengthening of national policies, budgets, decisions and legislation, to contribute to positive social transformation and enable affected populations to claim their rights
  • Advocate for the rights and voices of children and women as an integral component of humanitarian action  See 2.1.4 Humanitarian access and 2.3 Sectoral commitments (Key considerations on Advocacy)

Advocacy is also further described and contextualized throughout the CCCs in the
  • Roles and Responsibilities of HQ Division Directors, Regional Directors, CO Representatives and Chiefs of Field Offices, as well as National committees (See Institutional Responsibilities),
  • Key Considerations of every Programmatic Commitments: PME, Nutrition, Health, WASH, Education, Child Protraction, Social Protection, as well as ADAP, Disabilities, Gender, ECD, and Situation Specific Commitments: Public Health Emergencies, Large movement of Populations.
  • Key Considerations of the following Operational Commitments: resource mobilization, supply and logistics.
Communication and advocacy is featured as an Overarching Commitment which applies across every sector and programme area of the organization

Commitments:

1: Communication

Accurate information on the situation and needs of children, women and their communities and UNICEF’s response are shared in a timely manner

2: Advocacy

Advocacy is conducted at country, regional and global levels to protect the rights of children, women and their communities, promote adherence to international laws and standards, facilitate principled humanitarian access and the delivery of programmes, and promote child-friendly policies and practices

See 1.4.2 Humanitarian Advocacy

Benchmarks:

1. Communication

In line with UNICEF’s child safeguarding policy and ethical and safety standards:

  • Communication strategies are implemented in a coherent manner at country, regional and global levels
  • Information is released rapidly and regularly in anticipation of, and during the immediate aftermath (within 24 hours) of new emergencies or new developments in protracted crises
  • Key messages and updated facts are regularly shared with external audiences through media, digital channels and multi-media assets supporting audience engagement and resource mobilization
2. Advocacy
  • Advocacy strategies are actioned in a coherent manner at country, regional and global levels to address priority child rights issues and critical programming or policy gaps
  • Reliable data and child-specific information are regularly collected and used safely and ethically to influence decision-makers




How the Centrality of Protection is reflected in the new CCCs?


  • Centrality of Protection is reflected as a central guiding principle of UNICEF action ( in the chapter 1) and reads as follows: Protection is the purpose and intended outcome of humanitarian action and must be central to preparedness efforts, as part of immediate and life-saving activities, and throughout the duration of humanitarian response and beyond. UNICEF commits to design and implement a humanitarian response that helps keep people with vulnerabilities from harm, protect them from violence, coercion and abuse, reduce the threats they face, minimize their exposure to these and increase their capacity to cope. The protection of all persons affected and at-risk is central to UNICEF decision-making and response, including UNICEF engagement with states and non-state parties to conflict.




How Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) is reflected in the new CCCs?


Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) is described as a core policy and corporate commitment of UNICEF in the chapter 1:

  • UNICEF has zero tolerance for sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA) and is committed to the effective prevention and response to SEA, as set out in the Secretary-General’s bulletin, Special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse (ST/SGB/2003/13) and the .
  • PSEA is a core commitment of UNICEF, and a whole-of-organization accountability that includes active leadership by UNICEF senior management, a survivor-centred approach and contributions from all UNICEF programme and operations.
  • All UNICEF personnel (staff and non-staff), including consultants, individual contractors, stand-by personnel, UN volunteers, interns and other persons who work for UNICEF under an individual contract are required to complete PSEA training, and have an obligation to promptly report allegations of SEA.
  • UNICEF has an obligation to refer survivors for appropriate assistance, including supporting child survivors during investigations, and to cooperate during the investigation process.
  • UNICEF partners are also obligated to promptly report allegations of SEA to UNICEF, in accordance with the United Nations Protocol on Allegations of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse Involving Implementing Partners, and to meet the PSEA requirements outlined in UNICEF’s Programme Cooperation Agreement (PCA).UNICEF contractors are also expected to take all appropriate measures to prevent sexual exploitation or abuse of anyone by their personnel, including their employees or any persons engaged by the Contractor to perform any services under the Contract, and to promptly inform UNICEF of any incident.
Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) is also featured as an Overarching Commitment which applies across every sector and programme area of the organization :

Commitment:

Deliver on UNICEF’s commitment to protection from sexual exploitation and abuse

See 1.4.8 PSEA

Benchmarks:

All COs, with the support of ROs/HQ, establish processes to ensure that:

  • Every child and adult in humanitarian contexts have access to safe, child- and gender-sensitive reporting channel(s) to report SEA
  • Every survivor is promptly referred for assistance in line with their needs and wishes (such as medical care, mental health and psychosocial support, legal assistance, reintegration support), as part of UNICEF’s gender-based violence (GBV) and child protection programmes
  • The prompt, safe and respectful investigation of SEA cases, is consistent with the wishes and best interest of every survivor

UNICEF is committed to ensuring that all children and adults are protected from sexual exploitation and abuse across all of UNICEF programming. Every UNICEF Office contributes to achieving the above benchmarks by embracing a whole-of office approach, including through: the development of a Country Office Action Plan under the leadership of senior management with active contributions by Human Resources, Ethics, Operations and all Programme sectors; the designation of a PSEA Focal Point within each CO, including field offices; the mandatory completion of PSEA training for all UNICEF personnel and partners; and the active contribution to an inter-agency approach under the leadership of the Humanitarian Coordinator[1].

[1] IASC Championship Strategy on PSEA and Sexual Harassment (2018); IASC Plan to Accelerate PSEA in Humanitarian Response at Country Level,

endorsed by IASC Principals December 2018.





Principled Humanitarian Action

How are the humanitarian principles and commitment to Principled Humanitarian Action reflected in the new CCCs?


  • The CCCs aim at equipping UNICEF and its partners to deliver principled, timely, quality and child-centred humanitarian response and advocacy in any crises with humanitarian consequences.
  • The CCCs must be used by every Country Office (CO) as a framework to monitor the situation of women and children and take appropriate preparedness and response measures, in order to deliver predictable, timely, principled and child-centred humanitarian response.
  • A section is dedicated to humanitarian principles in the Chapter 1, describing UNICEF commitment to the 4 principles of Humanity, impartiality, Neutrality and Independence, as well as their concrete application in UNICEF Operations.
  • Humanitarian principles guide UNICEF action in every context, conflict-affected or not. In complex and high threat environments, humanitarian principles are critical to enable operations and to stay and deliver. More particularly, they guide UNICEF to make programmatic and operational decisions as well as to earn and maintain the acceptance among communities, authorities and among all parties to conflict.
  • A section describes the application of humanitarian principles in UNICEF operations (coordination, advocacy, security management, resource mobilization etc).




How Humanitarian Access is reflected in the new CCCs?


  • The CCCs state that UNICEF conducts humanitarian advocacy to Secure unimpeded and principled humanitarian access to populations in need and describe the roles and Responsibilities of HQ Division Directors, Regional Directors, CO Representatives and Chiefs of Field Offices to Establish dialogue and fostering strategic and principled collaboration and/or partnerships with the local authorities and, in conflict-affected contexts, with parties to the conflict for an unimpeded principled access and delivery of humanitarian assistance to the populations in need
  • The CCCs also highlight UNICEF role in its coordination functions, as a CLA, to Promote principled humanitarian action and humanitarian principles, especially in conflict affected contexts
  • Humanitarian access is featured as an Overarching Commitment which applies across every sector and programme area of the organization:

Commitment:

Seek to establish and maintain humanitarian access, so that all affected populations can safely and consistently reach assistance and services.

Benchmarks:

All COs, with the support of ROs/HQ:

  • Establish internal coordination mechanisms which define roles, responsibilities, processes, and tasks related to humanitarian access
  • Identify and equip relevant staff with requisite knowledge, skills, materials, and tools on principled humanitarian action and operating in complex and high threat environments (including civil-military coordination, negotiations for access and humanitarian advocacy)
  • Seek engagement with all parties to conflict, and other stakeholders, as necessary and feasible to earn and maintain access to and for the populations in need
  • Proactively pursue acceptance among communities and stakeholders
  • Engage in coordination mechanisms to establish and maintain principled humanitarian access, in collaboration with UN Agencies, national and local authorities and CSOs, within existing coordination mechanisms such as the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT), the United Nations Country Team (UNCT), the Security Management Team (SMT), and the cluster/sector coordination mechanisms

Principled and unimpeded humanitarian access is essential to establish and carry out humanitarian response. In all contexts, conflict-affected or not, UNICEF is committed to ensure that all affected populations can safely and consistently reach assistance and essential services.

UNICEF access to populations and programme implementation is grounded on a deliberate application of humanitarian principles in all decision-making processes and is supported by a continuous effort to earn and maintain acceptance of communities, authorities, and in conflict-affected contexts, of all parties to the conflict.  See 1.4.1 Humanitarian principles

UNICEF’s Access Framework[1] provides UNICEF and its partners with the guidance and resources to gain and maintain principled humanitarian access to populations in need. At CO level, Senior Management is responsible for establishing internal coordination mechanisms which define roles, responsibilities, and processes by which UNICEF personnel from Programmes and Operations collaborate to optimize humanitarian access.

In all contexts, UNICEF seeks to ensure its action is perceived by all stakeholders as apolitical, neutral, impartial and independent. This implies a strict distinction from political and military entities, including in UN integrated settings  See Engagement in UN Integrated Mission Settings in 1.4.1 Humanitarian principles, and the use of armed escorts only after a thorough analysis in the Security Risk Management (SRM) process that determines no other SRM measure is available to bring security risks to acceptable levels, as per the IASC Non-Binding Guidelines on the Use of Armed Escorts for Humanitarian Convoys

[1] See UNICEF Access Framework: add hyper link when released officially




What do the CCCs say about UNICEF engagement on Social Cohesion and Peacebuilding?


  • UNICEF Contribution to Sustaining Peace is described in the scope of the CCCs: The CCCs, in the chapter 1, mentions that : When relevant and feasible, without prejudice to the humanitarian principles of neutrality, impartiality and independence, UNICEF may contribute to the UN system-wide agenda for Sustaining Peace[1]
  • The overarching commitment on Linking Humanitarian and Development includes conflict-sensitive programming

Commitment:

Foster coherence and complementarity between humanitarian and development programming

Benchmark:

All COs, with the support of ROs/HQ, design and implement risk-informed and conflict-sensitive humanitarian programmes that build and strengthen national and local capacities and systems from the start of humanitarian action to reduce needs, vulnerabilities of and risks to affected populations; and contribute to social cohesion and peace, where relevant and feasible

All COs must implement risk-informed and conflict-sensitive programming that build and strengthen national and local capacities and systems to reduce needs, vulnerabilities of and risks to affected populations. This includes:

Responding to emergencies in a way that strengthens existing national and local capacities and systems, helping to safeguard women and children’s rights and deliver essential services to the most vulnerable and marginalized through:
  • Investing in the organizational and institutional capacity of national and local actors, including national and local authorities, CSOs, and the private sector
  • Strengthening national and local service delivery and management systems, including building the readiness and resilience of national social protection systems
  • Strengthening capacities of communities, particularly women, adolescents and children
  • Strengthening the leadership and coordination of humanitarian response by local communities and authorities

Identifying and analysing risks, shocks and stresses and implementing risk-informed and conflict-sensitive programming that:
  • Plans for the impact of shocks and stresses through appropriate preparedness measures to avoid possible disruptions to service delivery
  • Is designed to avoid exacerbating conflict and violence (i.e. conflict-sensitive)
  • Improves national and local capacities for disaster risk reduction, including sustainable climate change adaption

[1] The UN system-wide agenda for Sustaining Peace focuses on the contribution the UN system can make to end some of the world’s most devastating and protracted armed conflicts and support UN Member States in their efforts to prevent armed conflict and sustain peace. See General Assembly resolution A/RES/70/262 and Security Council resolution S/RES/2282 (2016).




What do the CCCs say about humanitarian-development-peace nexus?


  • The CCCs, in the chapter 1, mentions that : When relevant and feasible, without prejudice to the humanitarian principles of neutrality, impartiality and independence, UNICEF may contribute to the UN system-wide agenda for Sustaining Peace[1]
  • UNICEF contribution to Linking humanitarian, development and peace is described in a box

Linking humanitarian, development and peace

All COs design and implement conflict-sensitive programmes that contributes to social cohesion and peace, where relevant and feasible, by:

  • Focusing on the equitable and inclusive delivery and effective management of social services such as education, health, clean water and sanitation and child protection
  • Supporting the good management and delivery of essential services in conflict-sensitive, equitable and accountable ways
  • Promoting the participation of communities, especially children, adolescents and young people
  • Building trust and collaboration within and between communities
  • Strengthening individual coping mechanisms and capacities to deal with causes and effects of conflict and sustaining peace

In contexts affected by conflict, fragility and/or other major challenges to social cohesion, COs design and implement humanitarian programmes that:

  • Are informed by a robust conflict analysis and avoid exacerbating conflict and violence factors
  • Identify and seize opportunities to build social cohesion and peace in the delivery of services
  • Entail activities aiming at preventing the outbreak, escalation, continuation and recurrence of conflict, whenever relevant and feasible
  • Safeguard operational independence and principled humanitarian action when linking humanitarian and development programmes, especially in situations where the government is party to the conflict. In some contexts, it may neither be possible nor appropriate to engage in development action.

In all contexts, while contributing to collective outcomes, UNICEF humanitarian action remains guided by humanitarian principles and focused on its objectives of saving lives, alleviating suffering and maintaining human dignity during and in the aftermath of crises. Without prejudice to the humanitarian principles of neutrality, impartiality and independence, and when relevant and feasible, UNICEF contributes to the UN system-wide agenda for Sustaining Peace[1].

In UN Integrated Mission Settings, UNICEF seeks to maintain sustained engagement at all levels with the Mission while maintaining an operational distance to minimize the risk of compromising perceptions of UNICEF adherence to the humanitarian principles and acceptance with local communities and stakeholders[2].  See Engagement in UN Integrated Mission Settings in 1.4.1 Humanitarian principles

  • Key Considerations on conflict-sensitive programming and contribution to social cohesion, inserted in the category Linking Humanitarian and Development : included in agreement with Business Owners.

[1] The UN system-wide agenda for Sustaining Peace focuses on the contribution the UN system can make to end some of the world’s most devastating and protracted armed conflicts and support member states in their efforts to prevent armed conflict and sustain peace. See General Assembly resolution A/RES/70/262 and Security Council resolution S/RES/2282 (2016).

[2] See UN Integration/Working in Mission Context and the UNICEF Technical Guidance Note on Working with UN Integrated Presences, 2014

[1] The UN system-wide agenda for Sustaining Peace focuses on the contribution the UN system can make to end some of the world’s most devastating and protracted armed conflicts and support UN Member States in their efforts to prevent armed conflict and sustain peace. See General Assembly resolution A/RES/70/262 and Security Council resolution S/RES/2282 (2016).




What do the CCC say about UN Integration is featured in the CCCs?


The CCCs contain a stand-alone box on UN integration, providing guidance on UNICEF engagement in UN integrated Settings.

Engagement in UN Integrated Mission Settings

In contexts where the UN has a presence involving political and/or multidimensional peace operations alongside humanitarian and development actors, UN Integration policy devises how the different dimensions of the UN engagement (political, development, humanitarian, human rights, rule of law and security) work together to achieve peace consolidation aims[1].

The UN Policy on Integrated Assessment and Planning clarifies that “while humanitarian action can support peace consolidation, its main purpose remains to address life-saving needs and alleviating suffering. Accordingly, most humanitarian operations are likely to remain outside the scope of integration, which can, at times, challenge the ability of UN humanitarian actors to deliver according to humanitarian principles’’.

UNICEF seeks strategic engagement with UN missions whenever relevant and feasible, without prejudice to the humanitarian principles of neutrality, impartiality and independence. Key areas of collaboration include child protection, juvenile justice, reintegration of children associated with armed groups or armed forces, peacebuilding and sustaining peace initiatives and delivery of essential services.

UNICEF seeks to maintain sustained engagement at all levels with the Mission to maximize the Mission’s contribution to creating an enabling environment for humanitarian access, while maintaining an operational distance where necessary to minimize the risks for UNICEF’s adherence to the humanitarian principles and for staff security.

The necessary coordination and support with the Mission should be maintained alongside an effective separation of profiles and activities in the field in order to maintain operational independence and minimize the risk of compromising perceptions of UNICEF or the UN’s adherence to the humanitarian principles and acceptance with local communities and stakeholders[2].

[1] See United Nations Secretary-General, Decisions of the Secretary-General – 25 June Meeting of the Policy Committee, Decision No. 2008/24 – Integration, 2008 ; United Nations Secretary-General, UN Policy on Integrated Assessment and Planning, 2013; Integrated Assessment and Planning (IAP) Working Group, Integrated Assessment and Planning Handbook, 2013

[2] See UN Integration/Working in Mission Context and Technical Guidance Note on Working with UN Integrated Presences, UNICEF, 2014




How Private Sector and Innovation are featured in the CCCs?


Private sector is referred as global partner (See 1.2.3 Partnerships), but also as partner for resource mobilization, programme implementation (3.5 Partnerships) and operations (esp. 3.7 Supplies and 3.3 ICT).

  • Chapter 1: Intro: Targeted audience; 1.2.3 Partnerships; Child Safeguarding + PSEA (commitments of all contractors, incl the private sector); 1.5.4 Roles and responsibilities on Establishing partnerships. Private sector is mentioned consistently for the 4 following levels: CO/RO/HQ/National Committees
  • Chapter 2: Linking humanitarian and development; Localization; Humanitarian cash transfers; Nutrition, WASH, CP
  • Chapter 3: ICT; Resource Mobilization; Partnerships; Supply and Logistics (we need to add one key consideration for each)
  • References for Annexes include : Child Rights and Business Principles; Children in Humanitarian Crises: What Business Can Do

Innovation is featured as Innovative Technologies in ICT, Security Management and Supplies and Logistics and as Innovative Programming in Chapter 2.





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